Operation Marchioness

Roosevelt and Churchill:

Men of Secrets
Front Cover
David Stafford
3 Reviews
Thorndike Press, 2001 – Biography & Autobiography – 589 pages

Their unique relationship was based on linked national histories and partially shared nationality — Churchill was half American — similarities in class and education, a love for the navy, and a common belief in the superiority of Anglo-Saxon institutions. It was cemented by shared enemies: Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan. On these foundations, Churchill and Roosevelt constructed a fighting alliance unlike any other in history. But at the heart of this special relationship, hidden by layers of secrecy, was a far-reaching sharing of intelligence that was the most sensitive touchstone of their mutual trust.

From inside the book

2 pages matching Marchioness in this book

Page 137

Page 137

Page 140

Page 140
Where’s the rest of this book?

What people are saying – Write a review

Editorial Review – Cahners Business Information (c) 2000

Stafford (Churchill and Secret Service, etc.) wants nothing to do with the popular view of the great wartime partnership between Churchill and FDR. Not content with the sentimentalized portrait of a warm friendship based on shared pedigrees and world views offered in Doris Kearns Goodwin’s No Ordinary Time, Stafford demonstrates that the alliance of these two cunning leaders was the product of need and hard bargaining, not sentiment. He further contendsDquite rightlyDthat the complex relationship between the two was mirrored by the actions of their intelligence operatives. Stafford writes: “The most sensitive touchstone of trust between individuals, as well as nations, is how far they are prepared to share their secrets.” When Churchill learned that Hitler had called off his 1940 invasion of Britain, he kept the information from FDR and continued to implore the president to come to England’s aid. Five years later, as the war wound to its close, Churchill criticized FDR’s intelligence chief, William “Wild Bill” Donovan, for his successful efforts to thwart British plans to restore colonial outposts in Asia. As Stafford shows, similar intelligence clashes occurred throughout the war. Both FDR and Churchill kept much to themselves while at the same time building an often-productive joint intelligence infrastructure. In the end, Stafford’s book goes a long way toward proving the truth of an old adage favored in spy circles: “There are no friendly secret services; only the secret services of friendly powers.” Strong reviews and the continuing broad interest in WWII and FDR will produce respectable sales, which might be boosted by a major fall focus on FDR as the final volume of Kenneth S. Davis’s monumental biography comes out in late November. 8 pages of b&w photos. (Oct.)

Review: Roosevelt and Churchill: Men of Secrets

User Review – Bill Keefe – Goodreads

David Stafford certainly didn’t skimp on the details. Lots and lots and lots of information on the secret war fought in WWII from Roosevelt and Churchill down about three levels in the bureaucratic … Read full review

Editorial Review – Cahners Business Information (c) 2000

Stafford (Churchill and Secret Service, etc.) wants nothing to do with the popular view of the great wartime partnership between Churchill and FDR. Not content with the sentimentalized portrait of a warm friendship based on shared pedigrees and world views offered in Doris Kearns Goodwin’s No Ordinary Time, Stafford demonstrates that the alliance of these two cunning leaders was the product of need and hard bargaining, not sentiment. He further contendsDquite rightlyDthat the complex relationship between the two was mirrored by the actions of their intelligence operatives. Stafford writes: “The most sensitive touchstone of trust between individuals, as well as nations, is how far they are prepared to share their secrets.” When Churchill learned that Hitler had called off his 1940 invasion of Britain, he kept the information from FDR and continued to implore the president to come to England’s aid. Five years later, as the war wound to its close, Churchill criticized FDR’s intelligence chief, William “Wild Bill” Donovan, for his successful efforts to thwart British plans to restore colonial outposts in Asia. As Stafford shows, similar intelligence clashes occurred throughout the war. Both FDR and Churchill kept much to themselves while at the same time building an often-productive joint intelligence infrastructure. In the end, Stafford’s book goes a long way toward proving the truth of an old adage favored in spy circles: “There are no friendly secret services; only the secret services of friendly powers.” Strong reviews and the continuing broad interest in WWII and FDR will produce respectable sales, which might be boosted by a major fall focus on FDR as the final volume of Kenneth S. Davis’s monumental biography comes out in late November. 8 pages of b&w photos. (Oct.)

All 3 reviews »

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s