Destruction of Hugh Glass

By the early 1860s Hugh Glass was at his peak; in 1862 he was reputed the richest man in Victoria, worth some £800,000. As a businessman, he was a brilliant organizer with a detailed knowledge of the law which he used to his advantage. He was also alert to the possibilities of manipulating the men who made the law. For instance, in the 1860s he formed and directed an association aimed at influencing parliamentarians to pass land bills sympathetic to the pastoral interest. Although the extent of this control of members is uncertain, James McKean claimed in 1869 that one of Glass’s associations had spent £80,000 in influencing members. Without doubt Glass had made himself a force to be feared and reckoned with in Victorian politics. He created around himself an aura of absolute power and self-assurance. At Flemington House he entertained lavishly, while his office was a centre of financial and political influence and Collins Street his court. By his style of life he buoyed up his contemporaries’ trust in him, his methods and his empire.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957)Thursday 10 September 1868 p 6 Article … one of his colleagues. Perhaps, if Mr. Hugh Glass invited the (hon. member to take a glass1 he would … -ceived i ^y’juim, when administering tho governnienfiof this colony? ‘ Mr. MCCULLOCH behoved that thero had … 

1869

1869 Hugh Glass’s political influence in Melbourne came under attack at the same time. A select committee found him guilty of taking part in corrupt practices and parliament committed him to gaol. The Supreme Court, headed by Sir William Stawell, a former partner, promptly reversed parliament’s decision, arguing that the legislature had encroached upon the powers of the judiciary. The decision to release Glass was popular and he was widely congratulated. However, the popularity of his release derived as much from the feeling that parliament was corrupt, overbearing and ripe for censure as from any sympathy with Glass himself. None the less his political power had been effectively broken.

1869

MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1869. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957)Monday 22 March 1869 p 4 Article … subscribed by Mr. Hugh Glass, Messrs. Winter Brothers, and others, was one dated August 3, 1868, in favour of …

MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1869. Not the least curious and interesting part of Mr. McCULLOCH’S recent budget   27 March 1869 Hugh Glass admitted in his examination … Select Committee on Corruption resumed its sittings to-day. McCulloch denied having received any money in aid of 1869 Sir James McCulloch as Premier granted a life annuity of £1,000 a year by vote of the Victorian Legislature to Lady Darling, whose husband had died in England. 1865 Darling Grant. Scarcely had the excitement over the fiscal policy died away when another battle raged with greater intensity. This was the fight over what is so well known as the Darling grant. The Governor (Sir Charles Darling) was recalled by the Home authorities, because is was considered that he showed partizanship in assisting the McCulloch Government, and the majority of the Assembly to coerce the Legislative Council. As a tribute of national gratitude the practical Legislative Assembly determined to offer a grant, of £20,000 to Lady Darling. Cardwell had already decided that Darling’s actions had made him unfit for office; he was recalled to London and his successor appointed. Popular indignation over Darling’s ‘recall’ was widespread. Petitions, public meetings and torchlight processions preceded the departure of ‘the people’s Governor’, whom many believed had become a martyr in the cause of progress; others hinted that he was being sacrificed as part of a deal between the Colonial Office in London on the one hand, and the Legislative Council, the free traders and the pastoralists of Melbourne on the other. The assembly then resolved to make a grant of £20,000 to Lady Darling because the governor was not allowed to receive a direct gift. More constitutional crises ensued and Darling put his case to his superiors for the redress of his wrongs, on the ground that he had properly accepted the advice of his responsible advisers. But the response he received in the English press and in the British parliament was unsympathetic. Eventually the secretary of state informed Darling and the Legislative Assembly that Darling could not accept the grant. As a result Darling resigned from the colonial service in April 1867, and the Victorian government then included the grant in the annual estimates. The council rejected the appropriation bill.  1868 Finally in May 1868 Darling was allowed to withdraw his resignation and in July was granted a retrospective pension. Broken in spirit and fortune he died on 25 January 1870 at Cheltenham, England. At his death a separate bill was passed by both Houses of the Victorian parliament, at the instigation of the McCulloch government, which granted a pension to Darling’s widow and a sum for the education of her children. August 1867 The vote was included in the Appropriation Bill in August, 1867, when the Bill was thrown out by the Upper House. Sir John Henry Manners-Sutton (afterwards Viscount Canterbury), the new Governor, absolutely refused to follow the practice of his predecessor in endorsing the verdicts of the Supreme Court in favour of the Government creditors.

MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1869.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957)Monday 22 March 1869 p 4 Article
… subscribed by Mr. Hugh Glass, Messrs. Winter Brothers, and others, was one dated August 3, 1868, in favour of … MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1869. Not the least curious and interesting part of Mr. McCULLOCH’S recent budget

27 March 1869

Hugh Glass admitted in his examination … Select Committee on Corruption resumed its sittings to-day. McCulloch denied having received any money in aid of

6 April 1869

VICTORIA. [From our Melbourne Correspondent.] Tuesday. April 6.
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 – 1889) Monday 12 April 1869 p 2 Article
… Messrs. Hugh Glass and. Quarterman as two of the most active agents in the distribution of the money. Mr … Mimsterialiate hr tjunng freely of his intention to ait behind Btv McCulloch, and to show his loyalty to has …

VICTORIA. Tuesday, April 6.
South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 – 1881) Saturday 17 April 1869 p 12 Article
… of which Jones and others were assisted, and specifically condemns Messrs. Hugh Glass and Quarterman … and undue influencing of members of the Legislature. – – ‘ . ‘2. That Mr. Hugh Glass and Mr. John …

17 April 1869

THE SCIENCE OF BRIBERY IN MELBOURNE.
South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900) Saturday 17 April 1869 p 2 Article
… . Butters and Mr. Hugh Glass, both men of note in Collins-street, have been specially distinguished among … admitted to be sans peur et sans reproche. It is not insinuated that any of Mr. Hugh Glass’s favours …

22 April 1869
PARLIAMENT. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. THURSDAY, APRIL 22.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957)Friday 23 April 1869 p 5 Article
… . Hugh Glass. (” No.”), Well, Mr. Miller thought proper to suppress these instruction, and

27 April 1869

PARLIAMENT OF VICTORIA. Tuesday, April 27, 1869.
Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser (Vic. : 1842 – 1876) Monday 3 May 1869 p 2 Article
… ; modes of action the bribing and undue influencing members of Parliamennt, and that Messrs Hugh Glass … ; Mr G. P. Smith moved a resolution   stating that Messrs. Hugh Glassand John   Quarterman

1 May 1869

MR HUGH GLASS BEFORE THE CHIEF JUSTICE. Saturday, lst May.
The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 – 1870; 1914 – 1918) Monday 3 May 1869 p 2 Article

… MR HUGH GLASS BEFORE .THE CHIEF JUSTICE. Saturday, ls£ May. Xlio judges’ chambers wore fairly … rushed this afternoon, it having bccome known that Mr Hugh Glass’ ease was to be argued. Long before the … 1316 words

8 May 1869

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS. VICTORIA. Melbourne, May 8.
Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904) Saturday 15 May 1869 p 3 Article
… Sydney, died yesterday. It is reported that the Government intend rearresting Mr. Hugh Glass. C. E. Jones … Assembly Mr. McCulloch hinted at steps being taken relative to Jones’s and Butters’s re-election. Oxley … 480 words

MELBOURNE MEMS. [FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.] May 8th, 1869.
Wagga Wagga Advertiser and Riverine Reporter (NSW : 1868 – 1875) Saturday 15 May 1869 p 2 Article
… excitement prevails. The case stands thus—A writ of habeas was applied for on behalf of Mr. Hugh Glass, and … , and the leaders of the McCulloch party tremble in their shoes. The miserable attempt of the Ministry …

11 May 1869

VICTORIA. [From our Special Correspondent.] May 11.
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 – 1889) Friday 14 May 1869 p 2 Article
… of the Supreme Court in releasing from custody Mr. Hugh Glass, committed for a contempt of the House … since my last Mr. McCulloch on Tuesday late, announced to the House the release of Mr. Glass, by order …

14 May 1869

MELBOURNE. Friday, May 14th.
Wagga Wagga Advertiser and Riverine Reporter (NSW : 1868 – 1875) Saturday 15 May 1869 p 2 Article
… he had erred, he had not been guilty to the extent that had been made out. It is said that Mr. Hugh … Glass is about to commence an action against the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly for false …

18 May 1869

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY AND THE SUPREME COURT OF VICTORIA.
South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900) Tuesday 18 May 1869 p 2 Article
… Secretary :— ‘ That Hugh Glass and John Quarterman, having been guilty of contempt and a breach of the … . Parliamentary privilege is involved — a far more potent influence than any feeling entertained toward Mr. Hugh …

20 May 1869

REPORT OF THE PRIVILEGE COMMITTEE.
Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 – 1924)Thursday 20 May 1869 p 3 Article
… and undue influencing of • members of Parliament, and that Mr Hugh Glass, and Mr John Quarterman … adjudged that Hugh Glassand John Quarterman were guilty of a contempt and breach of the privileges of the … 2608 words

27 May 1869

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957)Thursday 27 May 1869 p 4 Article
… Obtaining his services on behalf of the respondent, Mr. Hugh Glass. Similar overtures are stated to have … condemnatory of the course pursued by the Assembly, Mr. McCulloch was rebuked, Mr. Higinbotham was praised …

29 June 1869

VICTORIA. [From our own Correspondent.] Melbourne, June 29.
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 – 1889) Saturday 3 July 1869 p 2 Article
… proposed appeal to the Privy Council against the release of Mr. Hugh Glass from custody by the Chief … VICTORIA. [ From our own Correspondent.] Melbourne, June 29. The secure hold which the McCulloch Mi …

27 July 1869

VICTORIA. [From our own Correspondent.] Melbourne, July 27.
The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 – 1889) Saturday 31 July 1869 p 2 Article
… question anent the imprisonment of Mr. Hugh Glass and others, is now in a fair way of being … ends, is expected to move for a Committee, and this will remove at once the objection which Mr. McCulloch …

CITY AND SUBURBS.

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 – 1954)Saturday 20 August 1870 p 12 Article

… £267, and proposed to pay that through the Land Mortgage Bank. Before it could be done Hugh Glass … the evidence disclosed the defendants’ case to be one of great hardship. They had been obliged by Hugh Glass

VICTORIAN NOTES. (From a Hotspur Correspondent.)

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 – 1954) Saturday 3 September 1870 p 4 Article

… indirectly as much Crown land as ought to keep the whole population. Hugh Glass or Big Clark were only … cious system of starving those who send them thither, and their anthem ?will be “Hungry Day.” Sir. McCulloch

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS. VICTORIA. Melbourne, December 6.

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900) Wednesday 7 December 1870 p 5 Article

… case of Stackpoole v. Hugh Glass, in which the validity of the latter’s assignment was questioned. … summary of the war news, and Sir James McCulloch. replied: — ‘No; as such a course would interfere with ..

PUBLIC MEETING.

The McIvor Times and Rodney Advertiser (Heathcote, Vic. : 1863 – 1918) Friday 13 January 1871 p 3 Article

  Hugh Glass from the charge of corruption and bribery, he ran no risk of being charged with anything of … district and the colony generally which ought not to be ignored because he did not agree wvith Mr. McCulloch ..

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS. AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS TELEGRAMS. VICTORIA Melbourne, May 13.

Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 – 1904) Saturday 20 May 1871 p 2 Article

… of new tariff being enforced to-morrow. Mr. Hugh Glass died to-day. He was born in 1817. Melbourne … now convalescent. In the Legislative Assembly Sir James McCulloch has intimated that the same …

VICTORIA. Melbourne, December 11.

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900) Monday 17 December 1877 p 5 Article

… bribery cases in which C. E. Jones, Hugh Glass, and others were implicated. His speeches on that occasion … deficiency in the Inscribed Stock Account. For ence Mr. Service and Sir James McCulloch were found hand … 2792 words

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